Central America

The brutal civil war conflicts of the 1980s are over but violence is rising from other sources in Central America.  Democratic institutions remain 
fragile and governments have been unable (and sometimes unwilling) to
 spur equitable development, curtail corruption, or combat 
increasing criminal activity. 



WOLA works with colleagues in Central America and the international community to prevent violence, support police reform and combat organized crime.  We monitor the impact of assistance and trade agreements on labor rights and 
sustainable economic development.  We support on-going efforts to establish the conditions for free and fair elections and to bring justice for human rights violations.

Central America News & Analysis

WOLA: Advocacy for Human Rights in the Americas

Video
WOLA is a leading research and advocacy organizations working to advance human rights in the Americas. To learn more about WOLA's work, please watch this short video.

WOLA Endorses Uruguayan Candidate for Next OAS Secretary General

Foreign Minister Luis Almagro is a Great Candidate to Ensure Human Rights in the Hemisphere
News
WOLA is pleased to announce its endorsement of Uruguayan Foreign Minister Luis Almagro in his candidacy to be the next Secretary General of the Organization of American States (OAS). WOLA believes that Minister Almagro is a great candidate to ensure respect for human rights and the rule of law in the region.

WOLA Statement on President Obama's Action on Immigration

News
President Obama has taken important steps to provide relief to millions of families who have been living and working in this country but who have lived in constant fear of unjust detention and deportation. The President’s actions will offer millions of people a chance to live with dignity and without fear of being separated from their families.

Building the Future in Central America

Requires Smart Investments in Safe and Sustainable Communities
Analysis & Commentary
On November 14, Vice President Joe Biden, the presidents of Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras, and the president of the IDB met to develop a joint plan for Central America. In light of the discussions, 17 civil society organizations in the U.S. and Central America outlined 6 key principles that ought to guide the new Central American strategy.